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Ripple Expands Global Regulatory Team and Joins Blockchain Association

Alo Kingsley   Oct 23, 2019 04:05 2 Min Read


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Ripple, the San Francisco-based blockchain startup, just announced its inclusion of four new members into its global regulatory team in Washington, D.C. These new members are; Craig Phillips, Michelle Bond, Ron Hammond, and Susan Friedman. At the same time, Ripple also announced that is has been incorporated into the Blockchain Association - an association that plays a fundamental role in the future of digital assets. This was announced in a blog post on Oct. 22.

 

According to the report, before being chosen by Ripple, Phillips Craig worked in the United States Treasury Department, where he served as Counselor to the Secretary. Through the Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Compliance Policy, Craig oversaw regulatory issues in the financial system under Executive Order 13772, alongside efforts to enhance the financial sector’s cybersecurity. At Ripple, Phillips will advise on strategic regulatory opportunities and also will provide counsel to Ripple’s leadership team.

 

Michelle Bond, on the other hand, served as the global head of policy at Blockchain and Head of Global Regulatory Affairs and Public Policy at Bloomberg, and Senior Counsel at both the Securities and Exchange Commission and the US Senate Banking Committee. Bond will lead the expanded global regulatory team in engaging with policymakers.

 

Friedman previously served as the Senior Advisor to CFTC Chairman Heath Tarbert. At Ripple, she will be working as an international policy counsel. Ron Hammond previously served as a Legislative Assistant to Representative, Warren Davidson, while at Ripple Hammond will serve as a manager of government relations.

 

Ripple indicated their excitement of being included as members of the Blockchain Association noted that the association provides a unified voice that will help to build close partnerships between technology leaders and policymakers.

 

 

Image via Shutterstock

 

 

 

 

 

 



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